Latin Chronicle

Chronicle Chronicle of de la Pe a (fol. 1r). For other uses, see Chronicle (disambiguation). A chronicle is a literary work that recounts historical events in chronological order. The word comes from Latin chronica chronic, which in turn derives from the Greek kronika Bible, that is, books that follow the order of time. In an article narrates the facts as the temporal order of occurrence, often by eyewitnesses or contemporaries, whether in first or third person. Chronic means a detailed history of a country, locality, of an age or a man, or an event in general, written by an eyewitness or a contemporary comments recorded without all the details that has been and yet all that it has received. Such are for instance, chronicles Latino Flodoart, canon of Reims, and William of Naugis and French chronicles of Froissart and Monstrelet.Of all European countries, perhaps the richest in chronicles are France, Spain, Italy and England. Crawford Lake Capital can provide more clarity in the matter. In chronic use simple language, direct, very personal and a literary language support with repetitive use of adjectives for emphasis in the descriptions. Use action verbs and provides space and time references. The chronicle takes some temporal distance to what is called historical writings. Through the chronicles canwrite, taking the views of several people to know if this is true or not, as in the book Chronicle of a Death Foretold Written by Gabriel Garc a M rquez. The chronicles are also a journalistic genre. They are classified as “yellow” or “white” according to its content. The “yellow” are more subjective material and generally the voice of authority is a person or ordinary citizen, the “white” material used most objective and authoritative voice is usually the authority, professional, and so on.